Iron oxide, spent, or Iron sponge, spent obtained from coal gas purification


Iron oxides are chemical compounds composed of iron and oxygen. All together, there are sixteen known iron oxides and oxyhydroxides.Iron oxides and oxide-hydroxides are widespread in nature, play an important role in many geological and biological processes, and are widely used by humans, e.g., as iron ores, pigments, catalysts, in thermite (see the diagram) and hemoglobin. Common rust is a form of iron(III) oxide. Iron oxides are widely used as inexpensive, durable pigments in paints, coatings and colored concretes. Wikipedia

Emergency Response Guide No. 135

Data from the Hazardous Materials Table

Source: 49 CFR §172 (2018/07)

(3) Hazard Class

4.2
Spontaneously combustible materials

(4) Identification number Help

UN 1376

(5) Packing Group Help

III

(6) Labels Help

Spontaneously combustible materials (4.2)

(7) Special Provisions (§172.102) Help

×Note:
Special provisions may be very complex. The extracts are taken from 49 CFR §172.102. Please be careful with the information, as necessary, additional conditions may be applied that are not written here. Please check the original source and report bugs.
B18
B134
IB8
IP21
T1
TP33
W100

(8) Packing Authorizations (§173.***) Help

(8A) ExceptionsNone
(8B) Non-bulk213see 49 CFR §173.213
(8C) Bulk240see 49 CFR §173.240

(9) Quantity Limits Help

(9A) Passenger aircraft/railForbidden
(9B) Cargo aircraft onlyForbidden

(10) Vessel stowage Help

(10A) Location
(10B) Other

Segregation Chart for Load, Transport, Storage

In this table a statement is contained for each hazard class whether the loading, transport or storage with other hazard classes is allowed, is not permitted or is restricted. The table is based on U.S.-Code 49 CFR §177.848.

red May not be loaded, transported, or stored together in the same transport vehicle or storage facility.
green Load, transport, storage together is not restricted.
yellow Load, transport, storage together is allowed under restrictions.